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Originally posted by NIST in the Cybersecurity Framework, the Framework Profile (“Profile”) is the alignment of the Functions, Categories, and Subcategories with the business requirements, risk tolerance, and resources of the organization.

A Profile enables organizations to establish a roadmap for reducing cybersecurity risk that is well aligned with organization al and sector goals, considers legal/regulatory requirements and industry best practices, and reflects risk management priorities.

Given the complexity of many organizations, they may choose to have multiple profiles, aligned with particular components and recognizing their individual needs. Framework Profiles can be used to describe the current state or the desired target state of specific cybersecurity activities .

Your Current and Target Profile

The Current Profile indicates the cybersecurity outcomes that are currently being achieved. The Target Profile indicates the outcomes needed to achieve the desired cybersecurity risk management goals.

It's important here to loop in goals from all business segments both business and security. That way, you'll have a more well-rounded goal set that aligns with your business's vision for the future.

The Value of Profiles

Profiles support business/mission requirements within your organization to all constituents, and also aid in the communication of risk between organizations. If you have a difficult time translating your current and taret risk and cyber strength to your partners, vendors and the like, creating a these profiles will be monumental in boosting communication between all parties involved. The better the communication is within and around your organization, the more progress you'll make in building a robust program or even creating a faster response plan.

If you're interesting in baselining your organization against NIST Cybersecurity Framework best practices in hours, let us know. You'll be able to see areas for improvement and gaps across all five NIST functions, and you'll have a plan of action on how to close those gaps within and around your organization.

 

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