Request Demo

Digital Risk Management

What The Winner Of CES' Highest Honor Says About The Future Of IoT

down-arrow

This week, technologists will gather in Las Vegas for what could be considered the hallmark event of the year for hardware: the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). CES can be best described as a glimpse into the future of the technology that touches our everyday lives: from in-car displays to virtual assistants to drones and (of course) the wealth of everyday objects that have been made “smart”. When we talk about smart objects, mirrors or trashcans, we’re referring to their induction into the internet of things. We’ve seen from experts that we could expect the next innovation in IoT technology to come in the form of better security. We saw it at the NIST Cybersecurity and Risk Management Conference, and apparently, CES agrees: the winner of their “Best in Innovation” award this year was none other than a security-based router. TrustBox by Scalys comes to the market just as many consumers welcome a host of new connected technologies into their homes following the holidays. We saw just before the end of the year, though, that oftentimes consumers are not aware of the necessary protocols to keep these devices from being harnessed by cybercriminals.

CyberSaint CEO, George Wrenn, has discussed the necessary role that device manufacturers need to have in developing stronger security protocols. Oftentimes it is a balance between user experience and security - while complex passwords and multifactor authentication are more secure, it can detract from a seamless user experience.

We expect to see more companies flaunt their security and privacy features at CES this year. Before the conference even began, Apple set up a billboard playing off of the iconic Las Vegas tagline: “What happens on your iPhone stays on your iPhone.” Comcast also announced a new Advanced Security feature for their Xfinity xFi service for an additional $5.99. With TrustBox taking home the Best in Innovation, we can expect security and privacy to take center stage for new devices.

What we’re seeing now, though, is how legacy IoT technologies that were rapidly developed in the name of securing market share are the devices in most need for greater security efforts. CyberSaint CEO, George Wrenn, has spoken about a device owners “right to patch”. In short, a device owner, whether on the enterprise IoT or an individual consumer, deserves to be secure regardless of when they purchased their technology.

What this means for device makers now is ensuring they have the ability to update the security and privacy technology on these devices as seamlessly as possible. As CES opens and we move into 2019, expect to see the convergence of user experience and security.

You may also like

CyberSaint at RSAC 2019
on March 7, 2019

Day two of RSA and booth number 1641 is bustling. In fact, the entire Expo Hall is awash with new product announcements, compelling demos, and striking amounts of swag. The ...

Becoming Better At RSA
on February 28, 2019

Next Monday marks the start of RSA Conference 2019, where a projected 50,000 vendors and practitioners will descend on the Moscone Center in San Francisco. The theme for the ...

Digital Risk Redefines Enterprise ...
on February 26, 2019

For information leaders today, there is increasing interest from non-technical parties - from the legal team to the Board - in the ongoing question “are we secure”. The challenge ...

DFARS Cybersecurity Audits: What ...
on February 21, 2019

It’s getting real – the government is moving from self-reported compliance to external audits of a company’s cybersecurity posture: drilling deep to evaluate that company ...

Risk Quantification: It's Not ...
on February 19, 2019

Many vendors and organizations alike see opportunity in the nebulous realm of risk quantification. As we’ve seen before, risk quantification is nothing new to the world - dating ...

Why GRC Needs IRM
on February 15, 2019

Today, every organization strives to optimize the speed with which they access information. Data is being stored, processed, transmitted and utilized in almost every day-to-day ...

Alison Furneaux